Viewing entries tagged
tiles

Naturally Timeless: Bathroom Design with Natural Materials

Naturally Timeless: Bathroom Design with Natural Materials

Designed by Marie Burgos Design -  Credit Francis Augustine   Floor and Wall porcelain tiles by Venezia Ivory - Caesarstone countertop

Designed by Marie Burgos Design -  Credit Francis Augustine 

Floor and Wall porcelain tiles by Venezia Ivory - Caesarstone countertop

The modern bathroom performs many functions - as one of the most used rooms in the house, it sees everything from early morning splashes at the sink, to long evening baths for winding down at the end of a stressful week. Making sure your bathroom is well-designed to fulfill your needs is important, as is creating a timeless and stylish theme which blends well with your home for years to come.

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo credit Francis Augustine   Marvel  Calacatta by Nemo Tiles 

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo credit Francis Augustine

Marvel  Calacatta by Nemo Tiles 

Natural materials are very popular for bathrooms, giving off a calming and relaxing atmosphere which people instinctively respond to. Stone is solid and traditional, and used in bathrooms for centuries thanks to its durability and connection with water. Marble is particularly favored for its luxurious and classic look, but there is such a wide range of colors, textures, and finishes of stone available that there is something to suit everyone. Wood might not be seen so often in the bathroom, but is growing in popularity and is fantastic for creating a warm and organic feel. Try dark teak paired with white stone for a strong monochromatic look, or pale oak and pastel shades for a softer, more comforting feel.

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo Credit Francis Augustine  Tiles: Volcano Sabbia Porceleain Tiles in Natural Finish by Nemo Tiles 

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo Credit Francis Augustine

Tiles: Volcano Sabbia Porceleain Tiles in Natural Finish by Nemo Tiles 

Think about what takes place in your bathroom and what areas you need - a family bathroom will be quite different to an ensuite in a solo pad. Using different natural materials to break up and connect these spaces can be an excellent way to inject some interest and character into your bathroom. A walk-in shower helps to maintain flow in the room, particularly if you think carefully about how your tiling can be turned to this purpose. Not being restrained by a pre-sized tray means you can make the most of what space and shape you have available, and by following universal design principles, this means that your bathroom will be accessible and usable for people of all ages for years to come.

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo Credit Francis Augustine   Floor Tiles: Thassos Marble - Floor Accent Tile: Seashell Blocking mosaic - Accent Tiles: Gardenia Calliope Thassos and Glass Tile from  Tile Bar   

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo Credit Francis Augustine 

Floor Tiles: Thassos Marble - Floor Accent Tile: Seashell Blocking mosaic - Accent Tiles: Gardenia Calliope Thassos and Glass Tile from Tile Bar  

Fixtures and fittings should also be accessible and easy to use, but be in keeping with the theme you have created. Brass or copper plumbing in rounded shapes can bring a warm, heritage feel with a timeless quality, and set off both wood and stone beautifully. Square silver options have a sleeker, more modern feel, but can contrast equally well.

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo Credit Francis Augustine  Countertop: Clamshell by Caesarstone - Sperry Wall Sconces from Hudson Valley lighting. 

Designed by Marie Burgos Design - Photo Credit Francis Augustine

Countertop: Clamshell by Caesarstone - Sperry Wall Sconces from Hudson Valley lighting. 

Plan your lighting carefully too, to make sure that there is plenty of bright and well directed light in places where you will be concentrating and paying attention to detail; but it’s also important to be able to create a softer ambience around the bath and shower. Your bathroom is functional and needs to fulfill its role, but also be comfortable and flexible to meet all of your needs.

Written by Jenny Holt 

 

Difference between Ceramic and Porcelain tiles

Porcelain and ceramic may belong to the same family, but they are two slightly different products. 

Both porcelain and ceramic can be used to cover walls, ceilings, countertops, showers and backsplashes. 

Ceramic Tiles

Credit: Cruzine.com   

Credit: Cruzine.com

 

Ceramic Tile is a mixture of clays, sands, water and other natural materials. The special clays are mined from the earth, shaped, molded to form square or rectangular tiles and then baked in a kiln to remove most of the moisture.

Traditional ceramic tile can be naturally colored and left unglazed like terra cotta.    

Traditional ceramic tile can be naturally colored and left unglazed like terra cotta.

 

Or they can feature colored or highly designed surfaces which can be glazed (finished with a glass surface) either in a high gloss or matte finish.    

Or they can feature colored or highly designed surfaces which can be glazed (finished with a glass surface) either in a high gloss or matte finish.

 

Porcelain Tiles

Credit: Surface.fr

Credit: Surface.fr

Porcelain tile is a newer form of ceramic tile.

Porcelain tiles are composed of fine porcelain clays and fired at much higher temperatures than ceramic tiles. This process makes porcelain tile more dense, less porous, much harder and less prone to moisture and stain absorption than ceramic tiles. 

Porcelains fall into two broad categories:

 

Through body porcelains: They have the color all the way through the body of the tile and as such do not have any glazing on the top to wear off.

Glazed porcelains have the porcelain clay with a glazed top like most non-porcelain ceramic tiles.

PROS AND CONS

Pros:

-Porcelain can safely be used indoors or outdoors.

-Porcelain  is less likely to crack due to freezing.

-Porcelain tiles are more dense so they absorb less water.

-Porcelain tile are less prone to stain absorption than ceramic tiles.

-Porcelain tiles are also harder and have higher breaking strengths due to their density.

-Ceramic tiles are easier to cut,  so easier to use when working in an oddly shaped area that requires a large number of special cuts.

 

Cons:

-Ceramic is designed only for indoor use.

-Ceramic tile is more susceptible to freezing- and thawing-related cracks. 

 

By Anaïs Gibaud

10 fabulous kitchen islands!

Today's kitchens are growing rapidly in size and many designers are adding kitchen islands along with the industrial appliances, state of the art cabinets and custom countertop designs that have gained recent popularity. The kitchen island has come a long way from the days of a single small table in the middle of the kitchen. Now, kitchen islands are often elaborated becoming fully equipped ‘kitchens within a kitchen', complete with sink, stovetop, and refrigerator. One of the most important benefits of the kitchen island is the additional work space, storage area and room for extra appliances that it provides.

Besides meal preparation, the kitchen can become a gathering area for family and friends if there is enough space. In many instances kitchen islands become central to the overall kitchen design and add a luxurious touch to your kitchen. Since so much happens in the kitchen on a regular basis, getting the layout right is important. The kitchen island can serve as an additional eating area, and food preparation can easily be done there. In a large kitchen, the kitchen island can shorten the distances within the working triangle (sink, refrigerator and range or cooktop) and make it more efficient.

Here are 10 amazing kitchen islands options for perfect kitchens!

picture-391

This spacious square island does double duty as workspace and dining table. How divine. (Design by Candice Olson.)

picture-401

Don't feel penned in by having to choose one material for your island's surface; this design incorporates both tile, perfectly matching the kitchen backsplash and butcher block. (Design by Didier Michot.)

picture-411

This kitchen seamlessly integrates with the dining and kitchen area. Very functional island integrating a sink, wine fridge and lots of storage space, below and above. (Design by Candice Olson.)

picture-425

Design your kitchen to fit your family with this modern space where the island integrate an electric stove and serves as dinner table. (Design by Candice Olson.)

picture-431

This elegant design has a raised section for a breakfast bar; the lowered section wraps around it on three sides. Paneled columns, moulding details, and wainscoting panels are all beautifully integrated (Design by Crown Point)

picture-455

This single-level island was designed with plenty of space for baking in mind. The Cherry island cabinetry is laid out in an "L" shape, and incorporates a second sink. The open area underneath the countertop makes for an easy way to slide the stools out of the way of someone carrying large bowls of cookie dough! (Design by Crown Point)

10' Long Kitchen Island

Now that's an island! Over ten feet long, three feet wide; designed with eight spindles for legs, and eight full depth drawers! Cherry stain with Van Dyke glaze on Cherry hardwood. (Design by Crown Point)

Round kitchen island

Modern kitchen featuring a curvy island with 2 integrated round sinks and modern rounded stools. Lots of curves all along...

Sliding kitchen island top

Wondering where did the kitchen go? With this modern kitchen island with sliding wooden tops, the sinks and stove disappear once you are done cooking! Amazing!

Pretty in pink kitchen island

Pretty in pink lighting accent on this extra long kitchen island. Very psychedelic and fun but also functional!

For more information about Interior Design and Feng Shui email Marie Burgos at marie@marieburgosdesign.com and visit our site on www.marieburgosdesign.com

Which kitchen island is your favorite? Are you planning to remodel your kitchen  in the near future? If so please let me know about it by leaving a comment!