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by  houzz interior design ideas

Call me crazy, but I’d give up all the comforts of my bed (supersoft cotton sheets, cozy down comforter and plump pillow-top mattress) for one with a knockout view. I’m know I’d sleep more sweetly if my last waking sight were the twinkling lights of a cityscape or the swaying branches of a tranquil tree. And I’d be happy to awaken to the sun reflecting off the ocean or, for that matter, even a backyard swimming pool.

I don’t expect to achieve this goal soon (or ever). But it’s fun to daydream and to immerse yourself in the fantasy of wraparound windows without worrying about the cost.

Here, then, are some drop-dead gorgeous bedrooms, all designed with a view of the great outdoors.

Although this bedroom overlooking Seattle’s Lake Washington is small, it packs a dramatic design punch. Its wraparound windows afford spectacular views of the placid water and leafy treetops, while its warm plywood ceiling provides a grounding touch of modernism.

Just steps from the slopes, this Aspen, Colorado, sleeping chamber has a warm, rustic look, with its stone wall and vaulted ceiling. The reclaimed-wood ceiling is finished in a natural patina. There’s nothing rustic about the seating, though: a modern Eames lounge chair and ottoman.

This New York penthouse offers sweeping views of the city through its floor-to-ceiling windows. That high up, you shouldn’t have to worry about inquisitive neighbors, but velvet drapes can keep out the sunlight — or moonlight — for a more restful sleep.

There’s not much to distract you from this Cincinnati bedroom’s tree-filled views other than architect Jose Garcia’s use of local wood. The room’s floors and ceilings are fashioned from ash harvested onsite. The columns are white oak, salvaged from a fallen barn in the area, with texture worked in with hand tools.

The perfect perch for movie moguls (or aspiring ones) is this bedroom in the Hollywood Hills overlooking downtown Los Angeles and the ocean. For privacy the architects at Griffin Enright frosted the glass along the bottom of the oversize windows. To do this on existing windows, you can have an opaque film applied in a process that’s similar to tinting auto glass. (For sources search online for “window tinting.”)

There’s no hiding from nature in this house: The architects at Estes/Twombley placed it right in the vast, open marshlands of Cape Cod, Massachusetts. This pristine bedroom, with its wall of double-hung windows, offers sweeping views of the tidal rivers and shorebirds foraging for food.

Given its hilly terrain, it’s not surprising to find drop-dead views in San Francisco. This elegant and serene bedroom takes full advantage of its perch in the Russian Hill neighborhood. The polished floors are engineered walnut with a clear finish, and high-end Schott antireflective glass has been used for maximum window clarity.

This glass-walled bedroom looks as though it’s open to the air, giving its owners a panoramic view of the Pacific (albeit not a lot of privacy). Never fear; the windows are actually taller than the ceiling by about 6 inches, providing a recessed pocket for roll-down shades.

Surrounded by established oaks, this master bedroom is truly nestled in the treetops. It occupies the entire third floor of a modern three-story house in Connecticut designed by Nautilus Architects.

This simple bedroom in a house in Montauk, at the far end of New York’s Long Island, features see-forever water views. The window frames, made of long-lasting steel for durability in the salt air, are from Hopes Windows. A simple wicker chaise from Ikea provides a perch for contemplative lounging.

This house was built to showcase the wide-open views of Northern California’s Mount Tamalpais. In the bedroom little gets in the way of the sight lines, other than an iconic Saarinen Womb Chair.

This stunning bedroom with a fireplace sits on a hill above the rocky coastline near Carmel, California. The gorgeous floors are fashioned from Cumaru, a tough and dense wood imported from Brazil that has a wavy, course texture. Because of its density, Cumaru is very resistant to termites and decay, and thus stands up well to the marine climate.

Imagine the sunrises and sunsets that flood this Miami Beach high-rise bedroom. The setting is all about glamour, with marble floors (4-foot-square slabs of Thassos), a cushy chaise and thick white curtains to pull closed when the owners want to shut out the world.

This oceanside bedroom on Long Island provides another perspective for bedside views. Architect David Ling designed these lower slot windows topped by bookcases to frame expansive views of the grass-covered dunes while the owners are lying in bed.